Resolve to "live vegan" this upcoming year
Dec 27, 2012 | 1532 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
To the Editor:

This year’s developments have certainly vindicated those of us who care about our health, our environment, and our treatment of animals.

In January, First Lady Michelle Obama unveiled revamped federal guidelines requiring school cafeterias to serve more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and less sodium and animal fat.

In March, a study involving nearly 38,000 men and 84,000 women by the Harvard School of Public Health concluded that one daily serving of meat is associated with a 13 % to 20% increase in the risk of death from heart disease or cancer.

The American Journal of Preventive Medicine estimates that prevalence of obesity among American adults will escalate to 42% by 2030, with a $550 billion increase in medical costs.

The Humane Society exposed unconscionable atrocities among three pig producers in Oklahoma and a Pennsylvania egg farm. It’s little wonder that 7 % of Americans consider themselves vegetarian or vegan and 28 % are actively reducing their meat consumption, leading to a 12 % US drop since 2007.

We should all consider following suit for this New Year’s resolution. Entering “live vegan” in a search engine brings tons of recipes and other useful information.

Brent Regan

Brattleboro
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