This Week in History
Dec 04, 2017 | 829 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Suzy “Chapstick” Chaffee worked at Mount Snow when  this photo was taken on Fountain Mountain in the 1960s. She was the airline attendant on the short-lived Mount Snow Express flights on Friday nights from NYC to Mount Snow.
Suzy “Chapstick” Chaffee worked at Mount Snow when this photo was taken on Fountain Mountain in the 1960s. She was the airline attendant on the short-lived Mount Snow Express flights on Friday nights from NYC to Mount Snow.
slideshow
10 years ago:

Patricia Farrington’s application for an events center at Honora Winery in Halifax was “deemed approved” after the zoning board of adjustment failed to act on Farrington’s application within the statutory 60-day deadline. ZBA members said they didn’t take up the application because a second application had been submitted later – which they believed superseded the earlier application. The town’s attorney, however, disagreed. One ZBA member noted that whether the permit was “deemed approved,” approved, or turned down, someone was sure to appeal the permit.


15 years ago:

Mount Snow’s decades-long search for snowmaking water brought them back to Somerset Reservoir. The reservoir, located at the back side of the ski area, would be able to provide more than sufficient water for snowmaking. Mount Snow had considered the option several years earlier, but shelved the plan when the company decided it would engender a difficult battle with environmentalists.

Local farmer and entrepreneur Jill Adams went to Italy as part of an agricultural exchange. Adams said she was there to learn how the Italian government helped develop the country’s agritourism business.


20 years ago:

Wilmington’s townwide reappraisal, required under Act 60, was on target for completion in the spring of 1998. The last appraisal was in 1984.

Whitingham School Board members were grappling with the reality of Act 60. The school board’s proposed budget was only up by about $15,000, or 0.06%. But there was concern that tax increases to support the proposed budget under the statewide property tax would be too much for local property owners to bear, and voters might slash the budget to only as much as the state’s basic education block grant would pay - $4,739 per student. In Whitingham’s case, that would mean a budget cut of almost $800,000.


25 years ago:

Hank Sweeney was on hand to celebrate the opening of the Tannery Bridge in West Dover. In 1988, Gov. Madeleine Kunin asked for entries into a competition to design a timber bridge, and chose the town of Dover to be the location for construction of the winning design. A Massachusetts firm won the competition. Key features of the bridge include a copper weather vane, copper sheathing, flower boxes, and a walkway for pedestrians.

The Reagan family, owners of Dot’s Restaurant in Wilmington Village, opened a second eatery in Dover. Dot’s of Dover, as it is still known, originally opened in the Dover Retail Center.


45 years ago:

A helicopter crashed on Mount Snow’s crowded Exhibition slope after an engine failure, but all three people on board the craft escaped serious injury. Miraculously, no skiers were seriously injured in the crash. One skier was cut, apparently by a rotor blade, but was not in serious condition. Another skier narrowly escaped injury but had his ski parka shredded by the blades. A young skier was knocked over by the aircraft, but only bent a ski pole. The pilot, photographer Victor Paulis, and Mount Snow Director of Public Relations Harold Thompson were lifting off to take some publicity shots.

Olympic skier Suzy Chaffee, Mount Snow’s director of creative skiing, scheduled a women’s “hot shot” skiing clinic at Mount Snow.

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